GEHU 207 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Turkish Cuisine Culture
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEHU 207
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims students to gain knowledge about Turkish food culture and apply that knowledge to their academic and professional lives.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Explain the historical development of Turkish cuisine
  • Classify Turkish cuisine within an economic, social and cultural perspective.
  • Describe the complex structure of Turkish cuisine
  • Discuss globalizing food phenomenon.
  • Evaluate different systems of food in the globalizing world.
  • Describe economic, social and cultural aspects of food
Course Content Understand that the Turkish cuisine is the result of the interaction of historical, economic, political and social dynamics. Enable students to be more conscious and more equipped while putting their knowledge of area and expertise into practice on both academic and professional platforms.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course
2 Why study food? Warren Belasco, Food. The Key Concepts, Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2008, p. 1-13.
3 From inner Asian plains to Anatolia: Ancient Turkic tribes’ food practices and first Turkish Empires Mehmet Alpargu “Turkish Cuisine Inner Asia up until the 12th Century” (eds.) Özge Samancı, Arif Bilgin, inside Turkish Cuisine, Ankara, Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2008 p.17-25 Altan Çetin, “Turkish Cuisine in the Karakhanid, Seljuk and Memluk Periods” (eds.) Özge Samancı, Arif Bilgin, inside Turkish Cuisine, Ankara, Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2008 p.27-38 Haşim Şahin “Cuisine during the Turkish Seljuk and Principalities Eras” (eds.) Özge Samancı, Arif Bilgin, inside Turkish Cuisine, Ankara, Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2008 p. 39-55
4 Food and its trade in the The Ottoman Empire: The Classical Age, 1300–1600 I http://www.muslimheritage.com/article/ottoman-palace-cuisine-classical-period http://www.turkish-cuisine.org/historical-development-1/ottoman-period-176/ottoman-kitchen-organization-179.html Arif Bilgin “Ottoman Palace Cuisine of the Classical Period” (eds.) Özge Samancı, Arif Bilgin, inside Turkish Cuisine, Ankara, Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2008 p. 71-91
5 Food and its trade in the Ottoman Empire- The Golden Age (15th-18th centuries) II Rhoads Murphey, “Provisioning Istanbul: The state and subsistence in the Early Middle East”, Food and Foodways, 1988, vol. 2, p. 217-263.
6 Modernization of Food in the Late Ottoman Period (19th century) Özge Samancı, “Pilaf and bouchées: the modernization of official banquets at the Ottoman palace in the 19th century”, Royal Taste, Food, Power and Status at the European Courts after 1789, Asghate 2011, p. 111-143.
7 Eating in the Republican Period Zafer Yenal, “‘Cooking’ the nation: Women, Experiences of Modernity, and the Girls’ Institutes in Turkey”, in Ways to Modernity in Greece and Turkey. Encounters with Europe, 1850-1950, (eds) Anna Frangoudaki, Çağşar Keyder, London: I.B. Tauris, 2007, p. 191-213. Marie Hélène-Sauner "The way to the heart is through the stomach" Culinary Practices in Contemporay Turkey (eds.) Özge Samancı, Arif Bilgin, inside Turkish Cuisine, Ankara, Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2008 p. 261-279
8 Midterm
9 Industrialization of agriculture in the world & Turkey: Green Revolution Documentary: Seeds of Freedom J. Dixon, H.-J. Braun, J. Crouch, “Overview: Transitioning wheat research to serve the future needs of the Developing World”, in Wheats Facts and Futures 2009, (eds) Dixon, et. Al., Mexico: CIMMYT, 2009, 1-25.
10 Symbols of Change: Tea Aylin Öney Tan, “Turkish Tea for Liberty: Çay Challenge Changing the Landscape of a Region and Drinks-cape of a Nation as a Political Choice” from the proceedings of Dublin Gastronomy Symposium 2018
11 Globalization of Food in Turkey Yenal Z. (1999) Food TNCs, Intellectual Property Investments and Post-Fordist Food Consumption: The Case of Unilever and Nestlé in Turkey”, International Journal of the Sociology of Agriculture and Food, vol. 8, pp.21-34.
12 Globalization in Turkey and Eating Habits Defne Karaosmanoğlu, “Surviving the Global Market”, Food, Culture & Society, Vol. 10 , Iss. 3, 2007, 425-448.
13 Organic and Ecological Food Dilek Himam, “A New Lifestyle of Metropolitan Individual: Organic Life”, Agrindustrial Design. Olive oil, Wine and Design. 1st product and service Design symposium and exhibition on agricultural industries, proceedings, Izmir University of Economics, 2006, p. 265-274.
14 Review of the semester
15 Presentation of Group Projects
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks

Turkish Cuisine Özge Samancı, Arif Bilgin (eds.), Ankara, Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2008, ISBN 978-9751733771

References

A Taste of Thyme: Culinary Cultures of the Middle East, Sami Zubaida and Richard Tapper (eds.) 1994, ISBN 1860646034

 

Wheats Facts and Futures 2009, (eds) Dixon, et. Al., Mexico: CIMMYT, 2009, ISBN 978-970-648-170-2

 

Royal Taste, Food, Power and Status at the European Courts after 1789, Asghate 2011, ISBN 9780754694786

 

Encounters with Europe, 1850-1950, (eds) Anna Frangoudaki, Çağşar Keyder, London: I.B. Tauris,2007, ISBN 9781845112899

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
3
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
    Total
150

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline.
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication.
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies.
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public.
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals.
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest