MCS 160 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Seminars in Communication
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 160
Spring
2
2
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The course is structured as a series of discussionoriented lectures on topics relevant to the research process as well as discussion of the research methods that communication researchers use in their work. As students of communication, understanding how social science works is essential to understanding how we know what we know about society. The course includes discussions on various research methods.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Evaluate major principles related to "what is designing a research project?"
  • Compare major characteristics of quantitative and qualitative methodological approaches,
  • evaluate the significance of quantitative and qualitative research methods
  • demonstrate ability to develop strong arguments and clear statements in a reasoned manner
  • have fundamental knowledge of content, discourse, semiotics analysis for media research projects
Course Content Throughout the academic semester, topical issues from around the world and Turkey will be evaluated and discussed in relation to the field of media and communication. Each week a new issue will be introduced and opened to discussion among students. Students will then be expected to develop an arguments and analysis regarding the issue of the week.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course
2 Key concepts in media and communication
3 Media and democracy Media and Democracy (1991), John Keane. The Media, the News, and Democracy: Revisiting the Dewey-Lippman Debate Author(s): Dell P. Champlin and Janet T. Knoedler.
4 Media and Ethics Jackquette, D. (2007) Journalistic Ethics: Moral Responsibility in the Media.
5 Media and human rights News Coverage of Human Rights Author(s): Jay S. Ovsiovitch
6 Media and representation of animate an inanimate life Magnetic Animal: Derrida, Wildlife, Animetaphor Author(s): Akira Mizuta Lippit
7 Media and utopia Reification and Utopia in Mass Culture Author(s): Fredric Jameson
8 Media and poverty Poverty as We Know It: Media Portrayals of the Poor Author(s): Rosalee A. Clawson and Rakuya Trice
9 Mid-Term
10 Media and Gender Toward a Genealogy of Gender in Walter Benjamin's Writing Author(s): Eva Geulen
11 Media and representation of environmental issues Science, Politics, and the Mass Media: On Biased Communication of Environmental Issues Author(s): Nils Roll-Hansen
12 Media and race Racial Identity and Media Orientation: Exploring the Nature of Constraint Author(s): Jessica L. Davis, Oscar H. Gandy and Jr.
13 Evaluation of the term
14 Review of the Semester  
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks

A reader will be provided by the course lecturer.

References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
-
-
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
16
256
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
1
45
Seminar / Workshop
-
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
45
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
376

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level. X
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest