MCS 312 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Network Society
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 312
Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The aim of the course is to make a theory informed introduction to recent transformations in societies and the role of communication technologies and processes in these transformations.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • are able to define the foundation for today's digital communication technologies in the frame of their historical development
  • are able to use the concepts network society, information society, new communication order, social media, networked social movements within the context of communication theories.
  • are able to discuss concepts such as social media use, online public debate, networked social movements within the context of communication theories.
  • are able to compare major characteristics og moders and postmodern societies.
  • are able to discuss the foundations for contemporary information age and network societies.
Course Content The course will focus on the definitons and conceptualisations of new media, social media, network society, social movements, the Internet, networked public spheres. An emphasis will given to power relations, historical backdrops, social interactions and technological developments with relation to these concepts.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 History of the Internet http://www.historyofthings.com/history-of-the-internet
2 Film Screening
3 Conceptualising the Internet Naik, U. & Shivalingaiah, D. (2008). Comparative Study of Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0. CALIBER 2008 Collections
4 Informationalism and networks Castells, M. (2004). Informationalism, Networks, and the Network Society: A Theoretical Blueprint. In Castells, M. (ed.) The Network Society: A Cross-cultural Perspective, pp. 3-49. Cheltenham, UK: Edwar Elgar Publishing.
5 The rise of network society Castells, M. (2004). Informationalism, Networks, and the Network Society: A Theoretical Blueprint. In Castells, M. (ed.) The Network Society: A Cross-cultural Perspective, pp. 3-49. Cheltenham, UK: Edwar Elgar Publishing.
6 Network society, social transformation, and key policy issues Castells, M. (2005). The Network Society: From Knowledge to Policy. In Castells, M. and Gustavo, C. (eds.) The Network society: From Knowledge to Policy, pp. 2-23. Massachusetts: Center for Transatlantic Relations.
7 Midterm I %30
8 A critical introduction to social media Fuchs, Christian (2014). Social media: A critical introduction. London: Sage – chapter 1: What is a Critical Introduction to Social Media?
9 Facebook and the network society Fuchs, Christian (2014). Social media: A critical introduction. London: Sage – chapter 7: Facebook: A Surveillance Threat to Privacy?
10 Twitter and the network society Fuchs, Christian (2014). Social media: A critical introduction. London: Sage – chapter 8: Twitter and Democracy: A New Public Sphere?
11 Networked social movements Castells, M. (2012). Networks of Outrage and Hope: Social Movements in the Internet Age. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press - Changing the World in the Network Society, pp.218-244.
12 May 1 Labor Day Holiday
13 Gezi Park movements Farro, A. L. and Demirhisar, D. G. (2013). The Gezi Park Movement: A Turkish Experience of the Twenty-first-century Collective Movements. International Review of Sociology (24) 1, pp. 176-189.
14 Midterm II
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Textbooks

Reading materials will be provided to the students bu the lecturer

 

References Course reader, Hand-outs, PowerPoint presentations Bibliography, print journals, open access journals

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
60
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
5
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
16
Final / Oral Exam
16
    Total
116

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication.
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest