MCS 450 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Daily Life and Communication
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 450
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The primary objective of the course is to enable the students to understand and analyze better the contribution of mass media to the repertoire of cultural meanings and practices of everyday life within the political, economic, social and cultural context.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students should evaluate the role mass media has played in the organization of society economically, socially, and culturally.
  • Students should examine the representation of daily life in mass media by analyzing a selection of media texts, including film, advertising, television, popular magazines and journals.
  • Student will have the ability to critically analyse and interrogate the social and cultural dynamics of new media technologies and their uses and impacts on everyday life.
  • Students should debate the main theoretical perspectives about the role of media in everyday life.
  • Students should demonstrate an ability to present a paper with a clear thesis statement or question by supporting this statement or addressing this question in a logical manner in order to draw logical conclusions from their findings.
Course Content This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students a range of theoretical debates about role of mass media in shaping everyday life by analysing a selection of media texts, including news, television shows, advertising, magazines, movies and popular music.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation
2 Television, cinema and consumption culture Certeau, Michel de 1984: The Practice of Everyday Life. University of California Press, BerkeleyMeltem Ahıska, Zafer Yenal, Aradığınız Kişiye Şu An Ulaşılamıyor. Türkiye'de Hayat Tarzı Temsilleri 19802005, Osmanlı Bankası Yayınları, 2006.Hugh Mackay, Consumption and everyday life, Sage, 1997.Silverstone R. (1994) Television and Everyday Life. Routledge.Gauntlett, D. & Hill, A. (1999) TV Living: Television, culture and everyday life. Routledge.Roger Silverstone, Eric Hirsch, Consuming Technologies: Media and Information in Domestic Spaces, Routledge, 1994.
3 Media, home and family Henri Lefebvre, Everday life in modern world, 1971. Patricia Pisters, Wim Staat, Shooting the family: transnational media and intercultural values, Amsterdam University Press, 2005.MacKay, H. and Ivey, D. (2004) Modern Media in the Home: An Ethnographic Study, John Libby Publishing, Rome.Kraut, R, Brynin, M. and Kiesler, S. (2006) Computers, Phones and the Internet. Domesticating Information Technology, Oxford University Press, Oxford.Stewart M. Hoover, Lynn Schofield Clark, Diane F. Alters, Media, home, and family, Routledge, 2004.
4 Music channels and popular culture Erving Goffman, The presentation of self in everyday life, 1959. Simon Emmerson, Music, electronic media, and culture, Ashgate, 2000.Simon Frith, Popular music: critical concepts in media and cultural studies, Routledge, 2004.Davis, G. and K. Dickinson (eds) (2004). Teen TV: genre, consumption and identity. London: British Film Institute.
5 Film screening
6 FIRST MIDTERM
7 Representation of gender stereotypes in media Carter, C. and L. Steiner (eds) (2004). Critical Readings: Media and Gender. Maidenhead and New York: Open University Press. Croteau, D. and W. Hoynes (2000). ‘Social Inequality and Media Representation’, in Media and Society: Industries, Images and Audiences. Eds. D. Croteau and W. Hoynes. Pine Forge Press, 193225. Hermes, J. (1999). ‘Media Figures in Identity Construction’, in Rethinking the Media Audience. Ed. P. Alasuutari. London: Sage, 6986. Wood, J. (1994). ‘Gendered Media: The Influence of Media on Views of Gender’, in Gendered Lives. Ed. J.Wood. Belmont CA: Wadsworth, 21358.
8 Patterns of leisure time and mass media Bruce Brown, Marx, Freud and the critique of everyday life, 1973. Moores, S. (2000) Media and Everyday Life in Modern Society. Edinburgh University Press.Wellman, B. and C. A. Haythornthwaite (2002). The Internet in everyday life. Oxford. Nurdan Gürbilek, Vitrinde Yaşamak (1992); Yer Değiştiren Gölge (1995); Ev Ödevi, (1999); Kötü Çocuk Türk, (2001); Kör Ayna, Kayıp Şark (2004).
9 Mass Media and language transformation David Chaney, Cultural change and everyday life, 2002. John Fiske, Reading the popular, 1989. Susan Willis, A primer for daily life, 1991. Stuart Hall, ed., Culture, Media, Language, Routledge, 2005. Sally Johnson, Language ideologies and media discourse, Continuum, 2010.
10 Film screening
11 SECOND MIDTERM
12 Food culture George Ritzer, The McDonaldization of society, Pine Forge Press, 2004.Maggie Wykes, Barrie Gunter, The media and body image: if looks could kill, 2005
13 Media, consumption and popular taste Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, Routledge, 1984.
14 Sport and the media Lawrence A. Wenner, Media, sports, & society, SAGE, 1989.Arthur A. Raney, Jennings Bryant, Handbook of sports and media, Routledge, 2006.
15 Classin activities (Language and television (reality shows, sitcoms, serials…etc.)
16 FINAL EXAM

 

Course Textbooks Detailed bibliography of the course will be delivered
References Daily new sources such as newspapers, television news & shows, magazines, advertisements and internet

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
5
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
50
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
4
65
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
12
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest