MCS 474 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Press and Documentary Photography
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 474
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to provide information about the development of press and documentary photography practices by focusing on the historical and cultural background of these disciplines, as well as examining current business and views.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to analyse the qualities that makes a photograph more powerful
  • Will define the contemporary approaches and attempts in press and documentary photography
  • Will relate the press and documentary photography with fields, such as, media, art, politics, culture and advertising
  • Will learn the relationships and effects of political and cultural developments on photography
  • Will be able to translate the visual language of today’s press photography
  • Will have the skills to practise what they have learned
Course Content This unit explores the elements of press and documentary photography, such as techniques, ethics and theories.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course
2 Brief History of Press Photography
3 “What’s in a photograph?” Please bring “any” photograph you think that is the most powerful and special “for you”. – The Ontology of the Photographic Image by André Bazin
4 Photojournalism - I Screening of War Photographer by Christian Frei (97 mins) and Deeds of War and Inferno books by J. Nachtwey
5 Photojournalism - II Photojournalism and Tabloid Press by Karin E. Becker
6 Documentary - I Moments in History by Charlotte Cotton
7 Documentary - II The FSA Collection of Photographs by Roy Emerson Stryker and The Postmodern View by Mary Warner Marien
8 Photo-Story and Features Country Doctor by Eugene W. Smith and the projects of Alec Soth
9 Ethics Ethics by Kenneth Kobré – Sample proposals will be given this week.
10 Curating Documentary Photography The Photographer’s Eye by John Szarkowski
11 Photography Agencies: Magnum, VII, Panos and Getty Images Project proposals must be submitted this week.
12 Photo Editing & Basic Lighting Workshops (additional weekend sessions can be given if needed)
13 Student meetings regarding to the projects
14 Film Screening Somewhere to Disappear (56 mins)
15 Visiting Lecturer Workshop and talk. Full attendance is mandatory.
16 Class presentation and discussion of the projects Full attendance is mandatory. An external examiner(s) will evaluate your works as well.

 

Course Textbooks Photojournalism: The Professional Approach – Kenneth Kobré• Photography – David Bate• The Photography Reader – Liz Wells• Photography: A Cultural History – M. W. Marien• The Nature of Photographs – Stephen Shore *** Related articles and/or materials will be supplied, if necessary. ***
References Documentary films will be screened, when necessary.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
20
Homework / Assignments
3
60
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
5,
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
3
Homework / Assignments
3
16
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
131

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline.
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication.
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public.
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals.
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest