MCS 490 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Media, Culture and Technology
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 490
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Developing student’s analytical thinking skills on debates surrounding technology and media, discussing technological breakthroughs in cinema and media within a contextual framework.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to analyze technological breakthroughs in relation to daily life.
  • Will be able to evaluate the relation between technology, media and cinema like coming of sound, VCR technology, television culture and paradigm shifts in the field occurred with digital.
  • Identify the main characteristics of new media practices.
  • Will be able to analyze how cinema and media operates as an interface on itself and other different levels like culture and economies of pleasure.
  • Will be introduced to the fundamental debates on the relation between media and future.
  • Discuss representations of technology in cinema and television fiction through an introduction of fundamental debates related with science fiction as a genre.
  • Grasp the main perspectives of network society and understand different interests of web culture.
  • Express critical thinking of media and technology in relation to culture and society.
Course Content This course is divided into four parts. In the first part major technological breakthroughs in daily life will be discussed. In the second part cinema, media, and technology relation will be analyzed. Consequently, the third part will focus on debates surrounding cinema, media and future; concepts like utopia and dystopia will be major concerns in here. In the last part representations of technology in cinema and media will be analyzed in relation to science fiction genre.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course. Handing out syllabus.
2 Technology and society Raymond Williams. “The technology and the society,” in Television: Technology and Cultural Form. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Pres,1992. 9–19
3 Media, home and family Silverstone R. Television and Everyday Life. Routledge, 1994.(Ch.2) 2452.
4 Internet and new media in everyday life Kraut, R, Brynin, M. and Kiesler, S. Computers, Phones and the Internet. Domesticating Information Technology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006. 3.21
5 Media networks and web culture van Dijk, J. The Network Society, 2nd edition. London: Sage, 2010 (ch. 2)
6 Media, technology and globalization Ritzer, George. Globalization: A Basic Text. West Sussex, UK: WileyBlackwell, 2010. Ch. 10.
7 Midterm
8 Body, identity and technology Marks, Laura U. "Thinking Multisensory Culture." in: Paragraph. Vol. 31, No. 2, July 2008, p. 123–137.
9 Science fiction: race, sex, and gender. Haraway, Donna. 1985. “A Manifesto for Cyborgs: Science, Technology and Socialist Feminism in the 1980s.” in Socialist Review 15/80. 65101
10 Cyberspace Benedikt, Michael. “Introduction to Cyberspace: First Steps” in Michael Benedikt (ed.) Cyberspace: First Steps.
11 Science fiction: utopia, dystopia, mythology Steinmetz, George. “Colonial Melancholy and Fordist Nostalgia: The Ruinscapes of Namibia and Detroit” in Julia Hell, Andreas Schönle (ed.) Ruins of Modernity. Welcome To Duke University Pres.
12 Cyberculture G. Deleuze & F. Guattari, “Introduction: Rhizome” in A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, tr. By Brian Massumi, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002, pp. 3–26.
13 Science fiction: time and space
14 Science fiction: depths of knowledge and collective un/conscious Sigmund Freud, “The Uncanny” in David Mc Lintock, Trans., The Uncanny. New York: Penguin Books, 2003. 123–134.
15 Review and conclusion
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks The readings mentioned in this information sheet.
References Class screenings plus suggested films.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
2
70
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
12
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
1
12
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest