MMC 304 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Sociology of Communication
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MMC 304
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To analyse the dynamics between media and social issues. To discuss the role of media in the construction of social realities and cultural identities.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • The student will be able to discuss the role of media in the construction of sociological concepts
  • The student will be able to discus national, regional and global issues from a critical perspective.
  • The student will be able to discuss the relation between media and power circles with an ethic and moral conscious.
  • The student will be able to evaluate particular concepts from political science and sociology with a media centric perspective.
  • The student will be able to discuss the relation between media and society from various theoretical perspectives.
Course Content In this course, the relations between media and society will be discussed thematically by focussing on a range of popular media. These media include women’s magazines, popular music, news, TV soaps, film advertising and sport. Themes include nationalism, globalisation, democracy, radical politics and gender.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Media Institutions and their place in society. Case study: “Good Night, Good Luck”. Burton, G. (2005). Media and Society: Critical perspectives, pp.5-26.
3 Media texts, ideology and society. Case study: “the Pacific”. Describe and hand out presentation Burton, G. (2005). pp. 46-54, 61-67.
4 Audiences and effects on society. Case study: “Resevoir Dogs”. Burton, G. (2005). pp. 83-102.
5 Media and violence. Case study: Shawn of the Dead”. Burton, G. (2005). pp.108-121
6 Media and politics. Case study: TV “The Simpsons”. Presentations on violence representations in Turkey. Burton (2005).pp. 108-123
7 Midterm
8 Globalisation: Popular music. Case study: “Rock ‘n’ roller”. Presentations on media and politics in Turkey. Burton, G. (2005). pp.146-173
9 Radical politics: Popular music. Case study: “Spinal Tap”. Presentations on effects of music globalisation in Turkey. Frith, S. (1981).pp 202-234 Way and Süer (2014)
10 Gender 1: Women’s magazines and gender. Case study: “Ugly Betty”. Presentations on radical politics in Turkish popular music. Burton, G. (2005). pp.130-145. Machin, D (2010) Cosmopolitan
11 Gender 2: TV Soaps and gender. Case study: “East Enders”, “Dallas”, and “Hanımın Çifliği”. Presentations on gender representations in Turkish magazines. Burton, G. (2005). pp.248-272
12 Nationalism in media. Case Study: “G.O.R.A”. Presentations on gender representations in Turkish soaps. Billig (1995). pp. 93-109
13 Nationalism in news Case study: “Forrest Gump”. Presentations on Turkish nationalism in media. Burton, G. (2005). pp.274-292.
14 Presentations on nationalism in Turkish news. Review
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks The readings mentioned in this syllabus. Each student will make one presentation throughout the semester. The presentations will be a Turkish case study on topics indicated in the schedule. The presentation is expected to be around 15 minutes including discussions. The midterm and final will consist of short answers and multiple choice questions.
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
70
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
24
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
10
Final / Oral Exam
1
10
    Total
140

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest