FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION

Department of New Media and Communication

GEET 304 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Ethical Decision Making
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEET 304
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course Discussion
Case Study
Lecture / Presentation
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Ethics is the study of how we ought to live well and how to live rightly. This course aims each student to have the opportunity to think deeply and systematically about the primary components of living a good human life and begin a lifelong process of reflection and self-scrutiny regarding her or his own life.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Define the major traditional theories, thinkers, and concepts in ethics
  • Analyze ethical problems, and defend his or her views both orally and in writing Develop critical thinking and writing skills
  • Apply these theories, concepts and principles both to controversial moral and social issues and to everyday ethical decision-making
  • Engage substantive personal reflection about the relationship between moral obligations and values and living a good human life
  • Develop critical thinking and writing skills
Course Description This course is designed as an introduction to moral philosophy through a number of central issues. The main aim of the course, therefore, is to introduce students with major theories, thinkers and concepts of ethics. Successful students will be able to apply these concepts and theories to controversial moral issues as well as to their personal, everyday life in a reflective manner.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course: Objectives and Expectations - What guides us while making ethical decisions? Lisa Newton, “The Principles of Ethics”, Ethical Decision Making: Introduction to Cases and Concepts in Ethics, Springer, 2013, pp. 23-31.
2 What is ethics? Socratic Beginnings Simon Blackburn, “Introduction,” in Ethics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, pp. 1-9.
3 Utilitarianism: Jeremy Bentham & John Stuart Mill Michael J. Sandel, Justice: What's The Right Thing To Do? New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010 pp. 31-57.
4 Duty Ethics Michael J. Sandel, Justice: What's The Right Thing To Do? New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010, pp. 103-139.
5 Personhood, Human Rights, and Justice Andrew Clapham, “Human Rights – a Very Short Introduction”, Oxford University Press, 2007, pp. 1-22.
6 Case Analysis & Movie Screening Movie: Extreme Measures (1996)
7 Midterm Exam
8 Virtue Ethics Michael J. Sandel, Justice: What's The Right Thing To Do? New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010, pp. 184-207.
9 From Virtue towards the Ethics of Care Annette C. Baier, 1987, “The Need for More than Justice”, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 13 (1): 41-56.
10 Animal Rights and Environmental Ethics Lori Gruen (2017), “The Moral Status of Animals,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Edward N. Zalta (ed.). URL: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/moral-animal
11 Markets and Morals Michael J. Sandel, What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets, Penguin, 2012, pp. 10-17.
12 Case Analysis & Movie Screening
13 Student Presentations
14 Student Presentations
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
25
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
35
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
15
1
15
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
0
Presentation / Jury
1
12
12
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
1
20
20
Final Exam
1
25
25
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of the discipline of new media and communication.

2

To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of new media and communication.

3

To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the new media production processes.

4

To be able to gather, scrutinize and scientifically investigate data in the processes of production and distribution.

5

To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.

6

To be able to take responsibility both individually and as a member of a group to develop solutions to problems encountered in the field of new media and communication.

7

To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problem-solving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report the conclusions of those methods to the public.

8

To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of new media and communication studies.

9

To be able to develop and use knowledge and skills towards personal and social goals in a lifelong process.

10

To be able to apply social, scientific and professional ethical values in the field of new media and communication.

11

To be able to collect datain the areas of new media and communication and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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