HUM 104 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Principles of Social Sciences II
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
HUM 104
Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To provide students with an indepth understanding of modernity with reference to its social, cultural, political and economic formations.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to discuss the significance of Renaissance and Reformation movements in the history of Western thought.
  • will be able to discuss the contributions of the enlightenment thought to the rise of modern/secular/rational society.
  • will be able to discuss the transformations in the types of political control in Western history and the rise of modern state.
  • will be able to elaborate on the transformed nature of economy and society with regard to the development of industrial capitalism and its impact on individual, workplace, and production relations.
  • will be able to realize gender inequalities and discuss its transformation under modern conditions.
  • will be able to discuss the declining impact of religion on social structures and individual in modern context with reference to secularization and sacralization processes.
  • will be able to discuss the social, political and economic impacts of globalization.
Course Content The course involves a careful study of the formation of various aspects of modern societies. It examines the key ideas of the Enlightenment, the development of the modern state, the economic formation of modernity, the relevance of class and gender issues to industrial societies, and the political and cultural significance of religion, secularism and ideology in the modern world.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course
2 Renaissance and Reformation movements Jocelyn Hunt, The Renaissance, Routledge, 1999. (The Beginning of the Renaissance, pp.1 7; Humanism, pp. 17 19; Scientific Change in the Renaissance, pp. 77 86; The Links between the Renaissance and the Reformation, pp. 49 51.)Chris Harman, A People’s History of the World, Bookmarks Publications, 2002, pp. 237 241 (Chapter 2: From superstition to science)
3 Enlightenment I Jonathan Dewald, Europe 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, Thomson Gale, 2004, pp.299 306 (Enlightenment).Peter Hamilton, ‘The Enlightenment and the Birth of Social Science’ Stuart Hall et al., eds., Modernity: An Introduction to Modern Societies, Blackwell, 1996, pp. 20 27.Chris Harman, A People’s History of the World, Bookmarks Publications, 2002, pp. 242 246 (Chapter 3: The Enlightenment)
4 Movie screening The Name of the Rose
5 Enlightenment II Jonathan Dewald, Europe 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, Thomson Gale, 2004, pp. 258 260 (Encyclopedie).Peter Hamilton, ‘The Enlightenment and the Birth of Social Science’, Stuart Hall et al., eds., Modernity: An Introduction to Modern Societies, Blackwell, 1996, pp. 27 35.
6 MIDTERM I
7 Birth of Modern Power and Authority I David Held, “The Development of the Modern State”, Stuart Hall et al., eds., Modernity: An Introduction to Modern Societies, Blackwell, 1996, pp. 63 73.
8 Birth of Modern Power and Authority II Gianfranco Poggi, The State: Its Nature, Development and Prospects, Polity Press, 1990, pp. 19 33. (The Nature of the Modern State)
9 The Emergence of Modern Economy and Class Chris Harman, A People’s History of the World, Bookmarks Publications, 2002, pp. 318 325 (Chapter 5: The Industrial Revolution)James Fulsher, Capitalism: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2004, pp. 59 131.
10 The organization of industrial society Barbara Bari, “Factory Work” (Britain, 1750 1914), Encyclopedia of European Social History: From 1350 to 2000, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2001, pp. 479 483.Anthony Giddens, Sociology, 3rd ed., 1998, pp. 240 263; 270 281.Movie Screening:Idle Class by Charlie Chaplin
11 MIDTERM II
12 Gender Issues Ian Marsh and Mike Keating ed., Sociology: Making Sense of Society, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006, pp. 263 308. Movie Screening:Birdcage or Tootsie
13 Birth of Secularism John J. Macionis, Sociology 8th edition, Prentice Hall, 2001, pp. 506 510. R.T. Schaefer, Sociology 10th edition, Mac Graw Hill, 2007, pp.3 19; 324 327.
14 Globalization in the contemporary world Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, “General Introduction”, F. J. Lechner and J. Boli eds., The Globalization Reader, Blackwell, 2008, pp. 15.Jan Nederveen Pietersee, ‘Globalization and Culture: Three Paradigms’, Economic and Political Weekly, 31: 3, (Jun 8. 1996), pp.1389 1393.
15 Movie Screening Babel
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks Must readings mentioned in this information sheet.
References None

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
14
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
25
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
65
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
14
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
17
Final / Oral Exam
1
22
    Total
165

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication.
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals.
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest