MCS 444 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Meaning, Language and Communication
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 444
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to provide a discussion of the major philosophical theories of language and communication that emerged in the twentieth century. It will cover both cognitive and normative aspects of the creation and understanding of meaning.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Explain different conceptions of meaning and language in terms of both classical and modern theories.
  • Evaluate the alternative cognitive and normative commitments made by different theories of communication.
  • Discuss pragmatic theories of communication.
  • Critically analyze different contemporary media and their content in terms of normative criteria pertaining to communication.
  • Define different kinds of speech acts.
Course Content This course will investigate communication as a social practice. It will carry out such an investigation along the two axes of language-use: the articulation of true (or false) claims and the formulation of arguments to produce various types of effect on people. Some of the questions that will frame our discussions will be: How is meaning created and shared? What are the criteria for meaningful linguistic expression? How do we distiguish sense from non-sense? How is language related to truth, on the one hand, and to norms, on the other? How do we distinguish (but also relate) the different kinds of things we do with language such as writing poetry, convincing others, knowing reality, and telling lies? What does it mean to investigate communication as a social practice?

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Overview of the syllabus and general introduction.
2 Logical positivism Carnap, Ayer, Wittgenstein
3 Cont’d from wk 2. Carnap, The Logical Syntax of Language; Ayer, The Concept of a Person and Other Essays; Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, selections.
4 Meaning as use Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations, selections.
5 Speech Acts and Pragmatics Austen, How To Do Things With Words.
6 Cont’d from wk 5. Searle, Speech-Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language, selections.
7 Linguistic Idealism Hacking, Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy?; Foucault, The Order of Discourse.
8 Language and Desire Lacan, The Agency of the Letter in the Unconcious, or Reason since Freud.
9 Midterm
10 Communicative Rationality Habermas, Moral Consciousness and Communicative action, “Reconstruction and Interpretation in the Social Sciences”.
11 Cont’d from wk 10. Habermas, MCCA, “Moral Consciousness and Communicative Action”.
12 Film Screening. To be announced.
13 Language and Naturalism Pinker, Language, Cognition and Human Nature,”The Congnitive Niche: Coevolution of Intelligence, Sociality, and Language”.
14 Cont’d from wk 13 Pinker, LCHN, “Natural Language and Natural Selection”.
15 Review
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
65
65
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
35
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
14
Final / Oral Exam
1
15
    Total
140

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest